Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image

Samsung Geeks | October 30, 2014

Scroll to top

Top

6 Comments

Galaxy S3 Inspired by Nature - to what extent?

Galaxy S3 Inspired by Nature – to what extent?

Is the Galaxy S3 Inspired by Nature? Samsung’s latest flagship device was received sceptically by critics who seemed originally afraid of its new, non rectangular design. “Where have you put my 90°” people yelled out in disbelieve that something more smooth and organic-looking could be manufactured to house the gubbins of a smartphone. The Galaxy S3 design was “inspired by nature”, so Samsung keeps telling us, but how was it inspired by nature? Which bits of nature and how does the Galaxy S3 compare to its inspirational sources? Let’s find out!

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6zAqnJiTAE]

Colours - Check

Pebble Blue – Inspired by Lapis Lazuli and Water Droplets

According to Samsung, the ‘Pebble Blue’ colour is  inspired by the blue of lapis-lazuli. Lapis-lazuli is a brilliant dark-blue stone with darker and lighter streaks. In the natural world, blue is a pretty hard colour to come by (apart from the sky!). As such it is quite a precious stone, the use of which dates back well into our early history, with ancient Egyptians using it for jewellery and ground down into that iconic blue make-up. If we compare some rough Lapis-lazuli to the Pebble Blue Galaxy S3, we can see that it sort-of is inspired by nature!

The Pebble Blue Galaxy S3 also has what’s called “Hyperglaze” technology. We’re not certain why that is deserving of such a spectacular name, but it does gives it a nice streaky effect of two colours. This is similar to the streaks formed by different minerals which make up Lapis-Lazuli. According to Samsung this transparent hyperglaze is “evocative of a water drop”. I’m not sure which water drops Samsung were studying to come up with that, but last time we checked water droplets took on the colour of whatever you can see through them. We’re not entirely convinced, but … sure!

Marble White – Inspired by the Sparkling of [Silicon Dioxide] Crystals

Silicon Dioxide is something we are most familiar with as sand. It’s used to make glass,  mortar and cement… it’s a raw material for silica which we use in silicon chipsets, fibre optic cables and is also fairly nice to relax on and make castles out of while at the beach! In many ways it could be considered one of the fundamental building blocks of a modern society: bringing us shelter, productivity and entertainment. Perhaps it is fitting that a device such as the Galaxy S3 is inspired by such a versatile and useful material: as it is itself a versatile and useful tool which embodies the culmination of centuries of technological advancement. Perhaps that is a bit far.

Galaxy S2 Marble White Crystals - Samsung Geeks

Above is a picture of the Marble White Galaxy S3 with some small crystals.  We can see where they’re coming from… the crystals are sort-of white and so are the crystals! Good work, Samsung design team!

Also – Marble (which isn’t Silicon Dioxide!) is in the colour description. The cleanness and smoothness of the GS3 is certainly very marble-like, and marble can be white… so yup, we’ll give them that one too!

Form - Dubious

Ok ok… I suppose it depends on how you interpret the word “inspired”, but most of the actual form factor of the Galaxy S3 doesn’t seem that natural. “Inspired” is fair enough though, as it would be hard to say the Galaxy S3 was inspired by a brick or a bottle of Soju, for example (although the latter is entirely plausible after a long day’s work). It definitely has a less corporate form to it than other devices on the market

Side – Inspired by swaying blades of grass

The curved lines on the side look pretty sweet. In fact it’s probably our favourite feature of the Galaxy S3 design. It looks sleek, artistic, unique, professional … and many other good adjectives. But Samsung say that it is inspired by “a blade of grass that sways in the wind”. We planted a Galaxy S3 in the garden with some grass, waited for a windy day and took this picture of it in it’s natural habitat.

Galaxy S3 Side - Blade of Grass - Samsung Geeks

Perhaps the grass is different in South Korea but we don’t really see this one! Also – if it is inspired by a blade of grass, why is it silver with an aluminium brush-stroke effect? That’s not very natural! It looks more at home next to steel knives than in the garden:

Galaxy S3 Side - Steel Knives

More foundry, less flowerpot if you ask me!

Front – Over Flowing Water

The front of the Galaxy S3 is designed to “portray an image of overflowing water”. We don’t get it in terms of design, but to feel this makes sense.(unfortunately limits in the evolution of internet-based tactile-technology won’t allow us to demonstrate this here).

Galaxy S3 - Leaf Water Droplet - Samsung Geeks

The glass on the front of the Galaxy S3 tapers off ever so slightly at the edges which gives a beautiful feeling of continuity and fluidity. You don’t come to an abrupt end and, at a stretch, we could agree that it feels a little water-fall like.

Back – Water droplet rolling of a leaf

The back of the Galaxy S3 is designed to look like a “drop of water rolling off a leaf and how it sparkles in the light”. Eeerrmmm…. “inspired” maybe. We don’t really get this one!

Conclusion

We love the design of the Galaxy S3. It’s fresh, elegant and almost certainly, though selectively inspired by nature. It incorporates ideas from nature in to a functional and good-looking device which (for once) is likely to appeal to all audiences and moves away from anything to corporate. For such a high-end device, having a good design is really important, and we think that Samsung has got it spot on.

Galaxy S3 - Inspired by Nature - Samsung Geeks

Here are some more pictures of the Galaxy S3 in nature. Let us know what you think in the comment below!

Comments

  1. pebble man

    I have a pebble blue gs3 and I can see the nature effects. Take time to really look at it, especially the display where your finger gently slides over the end of it.

Submit a Comment